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From the Editor-in-Chief of PowerBuilder Developer's Journal

Bruce Armstrong

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Top Stories by Bruce Armstrong

What we needed to do was implement spell checking in the rich edit fields in our application (see Figures 1 and 2). To do that, we got a license for the Sentry Spelling Checker Engine from Wintertree Software (www.wintertree-software.com). The utility is easily implemented and works quite well on standard Rich Edit controls. However, the PowerBuilder Rich Edit control is an OEM version of an old third-party control that was popular before Microsoft introduced its Rich Edit control to the common controls. As a result, the messages and functions it supports are completely different from those that the Sentry utility is trying to use to interact with the control. Our first approach to dealing with this was to extend the PowerBuilder Rich Edit control so that it mimicked the events and functions of the Microsoft Rich Edit control. However, we soon realized that the amou... (more)

PowerBuilder 12 and .NET

(July 25, 2008) - Back in 2002, Sybase announced their four-phase approach toward adding .NET support to PowerBuilder. Phase 1 was the implementation of web services in PB9 and Phase 2 was the release of DataWindow.NET, which was packaged with PB 10. Phases 3 and 4 were the more significant phases. In Phase 3, Sybase added a number of .NET target types to PowerBuilder 11 and added support for calling non-visual .NET assemblies from PowerScript. The 4th phase will be completed in PowerBuilder 12 and involves “...support for Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) ... as well as full... (more)

The Next Paradigm Shift...

First there were the thin clients. Not the Internet thin clients, I'm talking about the mainframe applications with dumb terminals. Everything ran on the server; the client was basically there only to display and for input from the user. Then PCs came along and a paradigm shift occurred toward thick clients. Really thick clients in fact. Not only was the user interface running locally on the PC, but often so was the data access layer, with the application accessing local database files or perhaps a shared database file on the network. Key reasons for the shift were a better user... (more)

Implementing the Microsoft Rich Edit Control

As we mentioned in Part 1 (PBDJ, Vol. 12, issue 7), we needed to implement spell checking in the rich edit fields in our application (see Figures 1 and 2). To do that, we got a license for the Sentry Spelling Checker Engine from Wintertree Software (www.wintertree-software.com). The utility is easily implemented and works quite well on standard Rich Edit controls. However, the PowerBuilder Rich Edit control is an OEM version of an old third-party control that was popular before Microsoft introduced its Rich Edit control to the common controls. As a result, the messages and funct... (more)

OLE - Extending the Capabilities of PowerBuilder

This two-part article provides a primer on OLE, some practical examples of its use, and demonstrates some methods for addressing the limitations of PowerBuilder's implementation of OLE. In Part 1 I provided some background information for OLE and discussed the use of custom controls, in Part 2 I talk about OLE Automation and OLE objects. OLE Automation OLE Automation is the interface through which one application (e.g., Microsoft Outlook) makes the methods, properties, and events of its objects (e.g., Folders, Messages, Address Book) available for use within another application... (more)