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From the Editor-in-Chief of PowerBuilder Developer's Journal

Bruce Armstrong

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Top Stories by Bruce Armstrong

As you may be aware, the company I work for does both PowerBuilder and RIA (Flex) application development. We actually create client/server and web-based front ends for the same application. Doing that has really emphasized just how much faster we can do development using PowerBuilder. Of course, we're originally a PowerBuilder shop, so one could argue we're faster using PowerBuilder because we know it better. But along comes a thread in the Adobe Flex Developers discussion groups on Linkedin with this heading: "I'm sometimes amazed at how unproductive [modern] development tools are compared to the client/server tools of 20 years ago."[1] There's a lot of discussion back and forth, but it seems that a number of other folks chimed in with similar feelings. While the development environment has changed (mobile devices and the web), many of the tasks that are simple t... (more)

Come on in, the Forums Are Fine…

What forums you may ask; the Sybase NNTP forums? No, those are going away. Not on the schedule that was originally proposed (December 1 of 2012), but they will go away soon. Replacing them are the online discussion forums in the PowerBuilder Development Center (PDC), part of the SAP Community Network (SCN). Never fear though, the information on the Sybase NNTP forums aren't going away; a searchable archive of the messages will be available. If you've been using PowerBuilder for a long period of time, then you'll know we've gone through a similar transition before. We started in on... (more)

PowerBuilder Editorial: Hi, I’m Mort from Ort...

Back in March of 2004, Eric Lippert of Microsoft explained in his "Fabulous Adventures In Coding" blog how Microsoft divides the developer community into three groups, each which is designated by a personality. Apparently, this is a practice recommended by Geoffrey Moore in "Crossing the Chasm". The three personalities are: Elvis: The professional application developer Einstein: The expert on both low-level bit-twiddling and high-level object-oriented architectures Mort: The line-of-business developer One of the major distinctions that Eric makes is that Elvis and Einstein got co... (more)

DataWindow.NET Pet Shop

In the early days of Java, a sample application called Java Pet Store was introduced as a "blueprint and guideline" for Java development. A few years later when Microsoft introduced .NET, they also provided a similar sample application to demonstrate preferred methods of coding for .NET called .NET Pet Shop. That has subsequently resulted in a bit of warfare as the two camps attempted to demonstrate why their implementation was a better, higher-performance implementation. To provide a sample of using DataWindow.NET, I took a look at the .NET Pet Shop with an eye toward demonstra... (more)

Implementing the Microsoft Rich Edit Control

As we mentioned in Part 1 (PBDJ, Vol. 12, issue 7), we needed to implement spell checking in the rich edit fields in our application (see Figures 1 and 2). To do that, we got a license for the Sentry Spelling Checker Engine from Wintertree Software (www.wintertree-software.com). The utility is easily implemented and works quite well on standard Rich Edit controls. However, the PowerBuilder Rich Edit control is an OEM version of an old third-party control that was popular before Microsoft introduced its Rich Edit control to the common controls. As a result, the messages and funct... (more)